Mass vehicle surveillance: the wrong way and the less-wrong way

Roger Clarke has a paper titled The Covert Implementation of Mass Vehicle Surveillance in Australia which looks at Automated Number Plate Recognition (ANPR), which he finds being done two different ways:

This paper outlines two alternative architectures for ANPR, referred to as the ‘mass surveillance’ and ‘blacklist-in-camera’ approaches. They reflect vastly different approaches to the balance between surveillance and civil liberties.

Basically it sounds like the wrong way is to collect all vehicle data in a centralized location regardless of whether the vehicle is suspected, and the less-wrong way is to have a list in the camera of numbers being looked for. About the latter:

Further key requirements of the ‘Blacklist in Camera’ design include: certified non-accessibility and non-recording of any personal data other than that arising under the above circumstances

This requirement is the kind of thing that Open Source Sensing advocates: note the word “certified”.

Apparently something somewhat similar to the latter method is done in Canada, but Australia is headed in the wrong direction, according to the author. —Chris Peterson

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